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McDonalds is teaming up with Ford to recycle coffee residue into car parts

December 12/2019

MOSCOW (MRC) -- Ford is looking to partner with McDonald's to recycle coffee chaff, the husk of coffee beans that peels off during roasting, said Businessinsider.

"By heating the chaff to high temperatures under low oxygen, mixing it with plastic and other additives and turning it into pellets, the material can be formed into various shapes," Ford told The Verge.

To start with, the chaff will be recycled and molded into headlamp housings for Ford products, which will produce lighter components and, in turn, improve the cars' efficiency. Both companies want to carry on collaborating with one another for a more sustainable future.

It might sound ambitious but, at Ford, the idea of using coffee to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cars is no laughing matter.

The American car manufacturer is planning to partner with McDonald's to recycle coffee chaff Ч the husk of coffee beans that peels off during roasting Ч and mold the residue into headlamp housings.

"By heating the chaff to high temperatures under low oxygen, mixing it with plastic and other additives and turning it into pellets, the material can be formed into various shapes," the manufacturer told The Verge.

Once heated, mixed with other components, and converted to bioplastic, the residue will allow car manufacturers in producing components that are 20% lighter.

Though the weight reduction might not seem significant, it will improve the energy efficiency of vehicles and in turn reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

Ford's interest in recycled materials isn't actually anything new; founder Henry Ford, was already using soybean-based products by the early 1940s.

Since 2011, soy foam has also been used by the company in manufacturing some of its products' interiors.

Though electric vehicle sales continue to grow across the globe, a Greenpeace report indicates that the automotive industry's global carbon footprint still contributed to 9% of the world's CO2 emissions in 2018.


mrcplast.com
Author:Anna Larionova
Tags:Bioplastiki, car components, biodizel.
Category:General News
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